foolish thoughts

April 1, 2013

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foolish thoughts

photos (1-4 from the Festifools flickr group http://www.flickr.com/groups/festifools/pool/show/)
1. lovely skeleton
2. ann arbor mayors john hieftje (heeft-ya)
3. audrey
4. green men…or women?
5. wayne white’s LBJ head from http://buy.beautyisembarrassing.com

This Sunday will be the 7th year of the Festifools event in Ann Arbor and I will once again be out of town. Gah!

This crazy University-Ann Arbor Community event is mostly a parade of giant handmade, paper maché puppets/kinetic sculptures, and many silly fools— in celebration of April Fools day. I think most of the spectators are really celebrating spring, art, community and creativity- my favorites!

The event has expanded to include a homemade luminary parade the Friday night before the event, food stalls and I’m not sure what else because I have never attended!

My daughter and I did help with puppet making one year. We mistakenly thought we were volunteering to make our own large puppets, but it turned out we were just paper machéing, for 3 hours, puppets for the students of the UM professor who started the Festifool event. It was fine, everyone involved was really great, but it wasn’t what we had expected.

One of these old days I am going to watch this fool fest. One day I’m going to make a puppet of my own—which anyone is welcome to do, with their own space and resources. Being in the parade isn’t that interesting to me. I would rather watch, but I imagine there are plenty of fools, or festifools, who would be willing to parade around with a puppet.

You see, I have thought about this.

Instead of making a puppet, I might make something like this creature on stilts…but maybe a friendlier version, so as not to make small children cry.

Or I might make something like Wayne White’s LBJ head (above) featured in the documentary, Beauty is Embarassing, which I really, really want to see. (I have only seen the trailer.)

Or maybe something like Fifi, sans the vehicle, made for Baltimore’s Kinectic Sculpture race (which I am also intrigued by!).

I will definitely not be making anything like the puppets from the play War Horse— I’m a hack, not an artist. Have you seen these puppets?! So fascinating you have to remind yourself they’re not real. (There are many youtubes of these puppets, just search War Horse puppets).

These creative images and possibilities will be percolating in my brain until the right time, space and/or enthusiastic conspirator comes along.

I hope that time is before the next Festifools event. I hope that next year, I will be in town to help contribute to the foolishness! I hope to see you there! And I hope, that you will want to carry my puppet.

Diy: block printing for blockheads

Linoleum block printing
image

photos:
1. starting to carve: image, block, lino cutter, tips and BAND-AIDS!
2. final print
3. amazing prints by others who printed with me (not art students, just crazy artistic, and many didn’t even know it!)

Genius or blockhead, linoleum block printing is for you. I promise, if I can do it, so can you! It will make you feel creative and awesome. And once you invest in the basic supplies (about $30), it is pretty cheap to do over and over again.

My print, picture above, is an Eames Zenith chair, in case you’re wondering. My son had no idea what it was. (Aw shucks.) But I really like the way it turned out.

I’ll post the basic how-to here, but there are many great youtube videos that will teach this, so watch a few of those for clarification.

I ordered supplies from dickblick.com, but I hope you can find them locally.

You will need:
• a block (we used 4”x6” for this, but they come in different sizes)

I have used EZ cut blocks, which are really easy to cut, hence the name. And I have used traditional linoleum, which is much harder, more time consuming to cut, but I feel like you can do much more detailed work on the traditional block—plus you get a nice artifact to set on a shelf when you’re finished. If you have never done this before, I would start with the EZ cut block.

• speedball lino cutter
• speedball brayer (ink roller)
• ink
• paper

You will also need newspaper to protect your table, a transparency or cookie tray or something washable to roll ink onto. Scrap paper, pencil, masking tape. There is something called a baren (looks like a hocky puck with a handle sometimes) used to apply even pressure on your paper when it is being inked…but I don’t use one. We used a dry brayer for this, but I think some people use the back of a wooden spoon.

Also important, Band-Aids! I cut myself FOUR times when I was carving, both because I was distracted by helping others, and because I’m super special. I was the only person to cut herself. Super special.

So here are the steps:

1. Getting your image on the block.
Come up with a great idea by looking at things you love, or by searching on “block printing” images online.

Once you have an idea you need to either draw that on to your block, or draw over the image with a pencil, then put your image face down on your block and rub with your nail to transfer the pencil you just applied to your block. You will end up with a faint version of your image, which you can fill in with pencil.

For my chair, I found a picture on the internet, then played with it in Photoshop to try to get it as close to black and white as possible (no shades of gray). You can see by the top image, I lost the shadows in the seat. When I traced the image with pencil, I had to decide where I wanted the shadow that would show the bucket of the seat. I drew over my image very hard with pencil, then flipped it over onto my block and rubbed with my thumbnail. Then I drew over it again, once it was on the block.

Remember that if you include writing, it should be backwards on your block so that when it prints it is the right way.

2. Carving
Once you have your image you will carve away everything that you do not want to pick up ink. So I left the dark parts on my block and carved away everything that did not have pencil on it.

Most lino cutters come with several tips (stored in the handle). The most severe “v” shape tip will give you the finest lines. The broader “u” shaped tip with clear away more linoleum faster.

Be VERY careful about carving away from yourself. Keep your fingers away from the path of your carving tool.

3. Printing
I tape newspapers down to protect my table from ink, then I tape a transparency down for my ink.

Transparencies are easy to wash off and to reuse, and the ink spreads nicely on this surface. But you can use a cookie sheet, or maybe even just the newspaper.

Put about a quarter size glob of ink on the transparency and roll the brayer through it as if you were rolling out dough. It looks like you are trying to spread the ink around, but really you are trying to get a nice even coat of ink across the surface of your brayer. You don’t want to over ink the brayer. Keep rolling until you hear a satisfying tacky sound as the brayer rolls through the ink.

Roll your inked brayer across your block. I re-ink my brayer and roll it on the block a second time to ensure there is enough ink.

Use scrap paper for your first several prints until you get a feel for how much ink you will need to get a satisfying print. You may find that you want to go back and carve a little more to get the print you want.
On my block, I’m not happy with the “noise” around the chair. I like that look for some prints, but I want a little cleaner look for this. So, I will likely go back and carve more of this away (after I wash my block off).

Every block has problem areas where it is difficult to get ink, so try to roll your brayere at various angles across your block when you are inking it. Once you test print, you will see where your problem areas are.

Once your block is inked, I suggest putting the paper carefully on top of the inked block and then running over the paper with a clean brayer, or a hockey puck, or the round side of a wooden spoon. This will ensure the ink is transferred evenly from your block to the paper. I have a large candle with a heavy cardboard sticker on the bottom—I’m wondering if that would work, or rolling a soda can over it…You want to find something that will transfer the image nicely to your paper. Try out a few things to see what works best for you.

You can also try putting your block down onto the paper and then pressing on the block.

You can also get fabric paint and try this on fabric. I haven’t tried it yet.

Good luck and if you do this, please send me links to photos of your prints!

claiming creative space

March 20, 2013

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photos:
1. forcebeyondcapacity.com
2. the selby, richard haines
3. collaboratephilly.com

Been thinking about “claiming” a creative space for myself in our house.

Currently, when I work at home I generally work on our dining room table, often pushing placemats and napkins or someone else’s books or mail out of the way.

We do have an office space in an open area on our second floor, but my husband uses that space and it makes me insane how messy, ugly and disorganized it is.

I don’t need anything big and fancy. Just a clean, non-distracting, inspiring space of my own. I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

my red purse

March 18, 2013

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photos:
1. my $6 vintage purse
2. TheVintageMistress (item sold), http://www.etsy.com
3. AbslewtlyVintage, http://www.etsy.com
4. ChicVintageWear, http://www.etsy.com

It is getting close to time to replace my lovely red handbag. I use this bag every day, and it shows. I have already glued one rip in the backside, and now it has sprouted another at the bottom. Sigh. I love this bag. I makes me happy to look at it.

I bought this bag at an antique mall for $6 in Appleton, WI when I was visiting my dear friend Cathy. (Who later sent me an amazing vintage navy bag, which is smaller and I use for dress up. What a wonderful surprise to receive in the mail!).

I receive compliments on my red bag wherever I go, and often hear stories about other vintage handbags. One sales woman told me she had inherited her mother’s vintage handbags and found in each one a color-coordinated switchblade. She knew her mother lived in a very bad area and had to walk to and from work each day, but she never knew about the switchblades. She said it was very hard to image her proper mother, who dressed to the nines, carrying a switchblade. It was not so surprising that they were color-coordinated.

That story made me grateful for much more than just a pretty handbag!

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diy: pretty flower bracelets

When my daughter was home on break last week we had a long list of projects we wanted to try. These bracelets were one of the few we got to!

I saw this project on the Oh Joy! Blog and wanted to give it a try: {Valentine’s Day} Floral Friendship Bracelets…

We are so ready for spring and those flowers are so pretty!

We changed a few things:
1. We didn’t have the time (or the production team) to dip dye the ribbon (though I do like that effect).

2. Instead of using real flowers, we used artificial so the bracelets would last. Finding artificial flowers for this was not as easy as I had expected. I found some papery flowers in the scrapbooking section at Michaels, and we bought a bunch of coral flowers that were on a plastic stem. We pulled them off and pulled out the plastic stamen that attached them to the stem leaving just the fabric flower. I don’t think I would use the paper ones again. I had worn the yellow one (paper flowers) to work before I took the photos and they had been in and out of my coat sleeve a few times and look a little worse for the wear.

3. Instead of using hot glue, we hand stitched the flowers to the ribbon. Not pretty on the backside. This can be covered with another ribbon for those who have the time!

4. My daughter used a snap fastener on the back—which is much more practical than tying a bow. I think I will do that with mine, which I now depend on someone to tie on me (and the long ribbon ends are not great when you are using the ladies’…)

5. We singed the ends of the ribbon in a flame (grill lighter) to keep them from fraying (a tip my mom learned from Martha Stewart).

Once you have the supplies, these are quick and easy to make!


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photos: 1) http://www.salvagesisters.co.uk/?p=1429 2) http://ampersandvintagemodern.wordpress.com/tag/cathrineholm/ 3) http://howaboutorange.blogspot.com/2011/11/diy-cathrineholm-candleholders.html 4) http://s3-media1.ak.yelpcdn.com/bphoto/NjgBIv58GhRNTngth5_qgw/l.jpg

Ah mid century, Scandinavian design, durability plus happy, happy color. Sigh. I would marry Catherineholm if she were a person. (But she’s not…and I’m married, so…Can you tell I’ve been thinking about this?)

I do not yet own a piece of vintage Catherineholm enamelware, but that day is soon coming (as is my birthday, followed by mother’s day, and I do like that red coffeepot).

In the meantime I delight in photos, so send me yours if you have any! (photos or cookware)

pretty things: you say, “lambretta”, i say, “i want that”

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(Photo sources: 1. http://vespaxporter.en.ecplaza.net/ 2. http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_luormmWeFU1qg7fuio1_500.jpg)

Ever since my friend Andy posted a photo of a vintage Lambretta scooter on his Facebook page, I can’t stop thinking about vintage Lambrettas and their sisters, Vespas.

In truth, I do stop thinking about them. but every few weeks they will pop into my mind again, and I find myself on Google image search to get my vintage scooter fix.

These scooters make me a little weak in the knees.

I have a secret fantasy of stumbling across a cheap “barn find” and restoring it lovingly, piece by piece.

Why no, I have never taken on such a project, but I’m a smart lady and a willing learner and besides, I did say fantasy so stop asking annoying questions.